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March 12, 2018 - No Comments!

A talk with Brandon Moreno, President of EverHive: A New Blended Workforce is Here

A tidal wave of change is coming that will make the way we work almost unrecognizable. There will be new ways to organize, recruit and manage.  Imagine having a seamless blend of high quality workers who work, on demand, to fill the talent needs of your company as it grows and changes. In this new future, which has already arrived for many, you have mastered this worker challenge and have a strategy to manage it proactively so that trusted relationships are built with the best individual and team players. Getting really good at this is no longer an option, it’s a necessity.

Those leading business today must figure out how to deliver value with new solutions.  Research states that already 40% percent of our workers are “non-employee” and are flexible on-demand skilled resources. Work will be delivered via platforms, projects, gigs, freelancers and technology has empowered us to be creative and solution driven.

Brandon Moreno, former HR & Talent Acquisition executive, now president of EverHive, is clearly ahead of the curve and helping organizations build strategy, processes and technologies to manage this growing blended worker cohort like no other services firm. His bottom line results are impressive. I was intrigued to learn more about Brandon’s perspective on the future.


Sherry Benjamins: Brandon, What led you to this business? 

Brandon Moreno: I have been involved in HR since 1993 and learned a lot from the leading companies that I was able to work with. Working with these business leaders and executives, we saw early on that if we did not add value to the business, we would be relegated to a merely transactional function.

The playbook for Talent Acquisition had to change. I am passionate about educating clients and elevating the conversation and actions to be taken around flexible, on demand highly skilled talent. The growing space of contingent workers captivated my attention and I decided to build a capability and solutions model to help companies manage these non-employee resources with a line of sight to improving the bottom line.

Sherry: How can managing the contingent workers impact productivity?

Brandon:  First, the growth in this segment is taking companies by surprise.  There are many organizations that seem to be running this ad hoc or with little priority on the program. We are seeing more CFO’s and CTO’s involved in the discussion along with Procurement, HR and heads of Talent Acquisition. We start with a client by understanding their current state, analyze spending and then partner with them to map out their future state of their entire end-to-end contingent worker program.  The goal is to architect and design a program that is customized but also efficient, effective and flexible.  There are many factors that impact productivity and creating base line metrics to manage this program sets the stage for meeting worker demand.  My goal is to help the client establish strategy, elevate and optimize their contingent worker function, achieve significant cost reductions, enhance compliance and streamline process.

Sherry: Why should the CEO pay attention to this change? 

Brandon: If a company’s non-employee workforce spending is growing (and many are in the $10 – 400 Million range), this has significant impact on the bottom line.  Surprisingly, there are many companies that do not have a handle on this aggregated cost.  Talent is the number one issue that keeps most leaders up at night and it’s their limiting factor for growth.  I understand how hard it is to predict what will be needed as the business changes, however, without a forward looking plan or integrated forecast, the CEO is reacting to changing demands and ad hoc solutions.  The ultimate goal is for organizations to have access to on-demand and flexible workers to complement their overall talent acquisition strategy.  Not only will this have cost benefits to the bottom line, but it frees up current employees to be more strategic and elevate overall business operations.

Sherry:  When launching this business, what have you learned that you didn’t expect you would?

Brandon:  I am most surprised in seeing the difficulty and fear that HR departments have in moving this conversation into a managed solution for action.  I understand this is a challenging problem for business leaders. Their positive intention is to get the work done with resources available.  I can see they have significantly less patience now compared to one year ago.  The fight for resources and the right talent is more intense now and addressing this requires a new mindset.  I am surprised that many say this is urgent, yet they are slow to act.

I have also learned that building trust, educating our clients and introducing tools that will help them start this work makes sense for many.  Others feel the criticality of an enterprise-wide solution.  Sometimes we take small steps to get them onboard.  Even smaller firms who see this tidal wave coming are better to build the platform now and think about contingent workers and unique skills required rather than wait until it is an imperative.

Sherry: What advice would you give business leaders today as they prepare for 2025?

Brandon:  Step outside of the comfort zone. Look at the talent challenges holistically and as though you are already in 2019 or 2020.  I know contingent workers have been around a long time but the growth in demand is taking many by surprise.  Ask your executives including HR to look ahead and be focused on running the business in pursuit of better outcomes and a strategic talent plan that eliminates ad hoc problem solving.  Five years from now, contingent workers will expect to be integrated into the workforce – an extension of your culture with a unique set of rewards that includes interesting and fulfilling work.

Concluding Comments

Leading the work in the future will profoundly change the world of HR.  Work will be deconstructed and dispersed with rewards being more short term and individualized. The organization will have an internal and external, permeable structure.  Kate Kjeell, SBC’s Managing Director facilitates a group of TA leaders in OC from premier companies.  She noted that managing a contingent workforce has been the top issue TA leaders have struggled with for the past three years. Awareness of the size, cost, liabilities and opportunities of this workforce is a significant catalyst for change.

To learn more about this worker and workplace change check out Brandon’s site and feel free to speak with him. (800) 945-6340, brandon@everhive.com.

http://everhive.com/

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Published by: Sherry Benjamins in Newsletter, Recruiting, Talent Economy, Uncategorized

March 12, 2018 - No Comments!

A Strategic Connection: SBC & EveryBusiness HR Essentials (EBHR)

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When two companies share a truly unique approach to their customers and are committed to the people side of business, why wouldn’t they team up? This year, S. Benjamins & Company (SBC) and EveryBusiness HR Essentials (EBHR) have agreed to a strategic partnership.  We believe that growing our shared resources will benefit our clients and teams.  Through this effort we are demonstrating the importance of openness and agility needed in business today.  SBC and EBHR are practicing what we preach.

We help organizations attract and hire great talent.  In addition to “finding the one”, we expand the conversation to include talent strategy and solutions beyond a single hire.  Sonya helps her clients embrace customized HR solutions at various key stages of their business growth.  Neither of us are a “one size fits all” firm and it is an exciting time to combine forces.

As we advise our clients about what workers want today and how they will thrive, we see less importance on hierarchy and more emphasis on reciprocity and creative collaboration.

How did we pair up? 

I met Sonya ten years ago.  We were hosting a learning event for HR leaders in transition and Sonya had just returned to California from a successful mid-west entrepreneurial venture.  She was looking for that next opportunity and what author Jenny Blake calls, “the pivot” to something new.  The successful pivot starts with a foundation of core values and understanding your strengths.  Sonya was entirely grounded on that front and was in the process of creating a vision for another chapter of her career in HR.  As  years passed, we developed a great relationship and exchanged ideas about our focus on the human side of business.  When she was ready to leave the corporate world and start her own company, we met to talk about the entrepreneurial life, which of course included the risks and rewards.

What I observed was Sonya’s quiet transparency, business savvy smarts and genuine positive spirit.  She was and remains open, curious and authentic about what matters.  She places purpose front and center.  EBHR cares about community, giving, learning and bringing the best ideas to her clients.  Our team values that too.  Most importantly we both approach our clients with a kind of care and commitment that I find energizing.  Together our firms support On Demand HR, Business Essentials (Work Design, Talent Strategy and Search) and Learning Forums/HRoundtables.

Our Plan

Kate Kjeell, our Managing Director and I are excited about this change and partnership with Sonya’s firm.  We’ll continue to focus on talent strategy and management search. That means finding our clients great leaders (in HR, Sales, Marketing, General Management, Operations) or helping them build their own capability to do that for themselves. For the past twenty years, we have utilized a project on-demand business model to deliver candidates and fill key management openings.  We augment our client’s existing Talent Acquisition function in a variety of ways.  Story telling in search is a key differentiator of ours.  We use creative approaches to help our clients tell their story to ensure we “find the one.”  Video, podcasts, marketing micro-sites are an example of the ways we increase our response rate with passive candidates.  The goal is to develop a high quality pool of talent for our client’s immediate and future needs.  It is all about meaningful and ongoing conversations.  We hope to hear from you to learn what you are up to and how we can stay connected and continue to learn from each other.

You can learn more about us at sbcompany.net & everybizhr.com!

Published by: Sherry Benjamins in Blog, Communication, Management, Newsletter, Recruiting, Talent Economy

January 31, 2018 - No Comments!

Leadership in the Future Turns Models Upside Down

It may be too late to catch up, as Bob Johansen, author of The New Leadership Literacies states, but it is a great time to leapfrog.  Looking beyond skills, Bob introduces us to the new literacies that are really a combination of practices and world perspectives.

We will not see predictability and volatility and uncertainty will prevail.  So, how will leaders prepare for this?  In the future, Bob maps out forecasting as a tool to look ahead and then back to prepare for changes that are coming.  He also introduces low-risk gaming (great chapter on gaming)  to hone our skills.  Personal energy will need to be high and this matches up with the emphasis these days on health, well-being and mindfulness.

As a search consultant, our role has been to find the talent that our client has profiled for success.  It can be a financial leader of HR VP.  There are often long lists of requirements as we launch a search and it becomes the challenge to triangulate hard skills, strategic skills and character for a gbob j picood fit.

Clarity will be king in the future.  I mean, if we are clear on who we are and what we value, and what our business is intended to deliver, this will serve as our guide in making decisions and evaluating talent.  Those long list of requirements will transform into a "top five criteria and deliverables" for success in your organization.  The hiring team will embrace that and use advisors or trusted talent evaluators in their company to keep the team headed in the agreed upon direction.  Then, we will start to see the old job posting and description become an artifact of the past.  The new mindset is select for potential and fit with both top fives addressed.  What was certainty in writing those old artifacts will shift and be "clarity" on what it takes to succeed and show up authentically.

Future talent will be continual learners, embrace challenge and lead from the edge of complex networks.  Bob says, hierarchies will come and go and "mutual benefit partnering" will take hold.  If a new leader needs an expertise he or she is light on, there is encouragement to partner inside or out.  Experimenting and learning will be a celebrated process for the best leaders.

It used to be that leaders needed to learn it all and know it all - that is gone in this future.  Now, we will be measured on how to nurture and develop shared resources and ourselves from wonderfully diverse networks.  Sound good?  Our development will be as good as our network is.  Our success will be based on how open our companies are about listening to and learning from our talent.  Are you ready to leapfrog!

Published by: Sherry Benjamins in Communication, Management, Recruiting

October 14, 2017 - No Comments!

Are Robots Taking Over?

Some people think that dramatic improvement in robotics and AI puts us on the road to a jobless future.  MIT researchers Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee say we are in the "second machine age."  It is true that many jobs will be at risk of being automated and it is happening right now.   It is true the workplace is transforming.  However, the job market does not show that robots are on the rise yet.  Our clients share that they see a shortage of skilled folks and not a labor surplus.  If automation to replace humans was really impacting us now, we might see more job turnover.  One study written by the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation says that "levels of job churn are at historic lows."  Barcelona star sculpture

We can't deny huge changes in work, workers and the workplace.  I respect what exists today and look forward to having the influence to change everything.  This sculpture is in the harbor in Barcelona, called Miraestels.  I was just there and loved this inspiring structure - he is holding a hidden star behind and he seems to pose a question, and imagines a possibility yet he is awaiting a response.

We in the people business don't have to wait for a response.

To get at some of the workplace questions, we hosted Kevin Mulcahy, author of the Future Workplace Experience and Dean Carter, head of HR and Shared Services for Patagonia on October 3rd with 100 senior executives to ask questions and learn of their perspective on change.

One message was, "The strongest organizations today are learning machines."  That does not mean robots that learn, it means humans learning to leverage technology and be agile in the face of huge change.

There is a focus on productivity (app-ification) for almost everything, from performance, to how you give feedback, understand your talent and worker expectations as well as profiling success.  The majority of our attendees, who are senior executives in HR or Talent said that digital analytics and workforce analytics is the next big thing for them. Data is king.  But there was recognition that having a strategy and clear assumptions about change needed is essential.

Kevin Mulcahy says, "Pick your trends."  Make the case for change and articulate the assumptions around this before you leap ahead with analytics or how you want to transform the workplace.

There was also discussion about Recruiting and the automation that will allow greater efficiency and the ability to build eco-systems of talent that are aligned with the organizations values, purpose and career paths.  Dean Carter talked about building communities of people who might want to work with Patagonia but the company or individual may not be ready.  His company curates conversations with talent that shares their values and purpose driven culture.  He urged us all to think broadly about ongoing and continuous conversations with talent and why having a clear and compelling employer brand is critically important to answer  the "why work here" question.

Are you a workplace activist?  You need to be...the robot will not play that role at all.  We have the opportunity in the people business to be the catalyst for change and to speak boldly about the big bets for the future and what can be started now. Go to it.

Published by: Sherry Benjamins in Communication, Employee Engagement, Recruiting

May 13, 2017 - No Comments!

Learn the Unexpected

There was a fascinating article in the Opinion Section of the Wall Street today that highlights Barbara Oakley,  a Professor at Oakland University, Michigan and her book called Mindshift.  It is a deep dive into the science and practice of learning. Her personal story truly demonstrates a multi-faceted journey in learning.   We place obstacles in our way when confronted with new learning challenges.  I can say that from personal experience.  However, according to Professor Oakley, this holds us back from new outlooks.

I was taken by the notion of learning something new as a workout to the centers of the brain that are most affected by aging.   That was not a new notion but hit home for sure.

What really captivated my imagination was the idea of learning the unexpected. Do we allow ourselves the vulnerability to ask, "Who do we want to become in our work and what needs to be explored in this life?"  Not often enough.  It is consuming to just respond to everyday challenges that are right in front of us let alone think out into what we want for our future self.

I attended a workshop a few weeks ago in San Francisco, facilitated by my favorite corporate poet and philosopher, David Whyte.  He is working with executives to help them be "Half a Shade Braver" (his new topic and CD) and be vulnerable and risk yourself in leadership. That often means surrendering to the unknown and reflecting on key questions that we have inside of us that will patiently wait for us to answer.  Those questions are not going away, says David Whyte.

The mindshift that Professor Oakley speaks of had me reflecting on the workshop with David. The question that I want to ask is, "what parts of me have I not spoken of or developed yet in my work?" What are the possibilities?  It is an exciting time at any age to hold the possibilities in your hands and learn how to learn.

 

Published by: Sherry Benjamins in Employee Engagement, Management, Recruiting, Uncategorized

February 26, 2017 - No Comments!

Redefining Success – meet an MBA student

I had the opportunity to meet an MBA class from the Talent Management program this past week at Pepperdine Malibu campus.  Apparently this is a new one year MBA program within the Graziadio Business School that is focused on talent management.   The students come with experience in HR.  They have an impressive curiosity and point of view around talent and what it takes to engage people today.  They are engaged and enthusiastic about the new world of work.

They are redefining success for themselves and no doubt will challenge the status quo.  That is refreshing.  If you have not met any of the Pepperdine grads - take the time to do so!  Some are unconventional, however, and that is what was exciting.

Professor Jack Gregg asked me to speak to the class and knowing Jack for so many years and respecting his passion for learning, I accepted and really enjoyed the experience.  We discussed the "New Take on Talent" and how that is playing out in work, workers and the workplace of the future.  Specifically I shared perspective and data on engagement and how that is changing with many driving forces in the business and with what talent wants now.   I shared real examples of what we are seeing in progressive organizations and how the employee experience is driving change.

They asked great questions and were energized with our discussion about where new work is happening in the next few years and how they can redefine that for themselves.

Following the presentation several students introduced themselves and expressed interest in internships for the summer.  This is part of the requirement for their graduation.  What a great way to meet new grads with new ideas.   Upon returning to my office later that day (yes, it was a long drive) there were many linkedin requests from the students.  They were personalized and thoughtful.  Congrats to them for using the concept of "tailoring" your message to a new connection.  Check out this program.  More important is to meet an MBA or graduating student who expresses interest in talent and talent managing. They have redefined success and we can all learn from this.

Published by: Sherry Benjamins in Employee Engagement, Recruiting

January 21, 2017 - No Comments!

Changing the Conversation – Women can Do it all not have it all

I read today that Brenda Barnes, former CEO of Sara Lee Corporation and also 22 years at Pepsi, passed away at too young an age.  In 1997, she had the courage to make personal choices that many did not understand at the time and created quite a stir for "resigning corporate America" to spend time with her children and focus on family. It prompted a discussion about whether women can have it all - family and career.

I am hopeful that we are shifting from the "have it all" conversation to "doing it all."  Listening to her daughter on NPR this morning made me think about the doing it all with the support of enlightened leaders and CEO's that get it.  This happens to be a month of hearing from women, men and diverse populations that they care about issues that impact them and this community.

Women need to work and want to do good work as well as care for their family.  Why aren't more companies who say they care about bringing women into their organizations and developing them, stepping up to policies that support them? I know a lot of good things are happening and I plan to ask more about what they are and write about it.

Two observations here:

First, I respect and admire our team here at S. Benjamins & Co.  We are fortunate to have amazing women who have designed blended life styles with family as priority and work (that we are proud of) that is meaningful and making lives better.  They inspire me and they deliver incredible quality work in a flexible yet highly accountable environment.

Second, I had the opportunity to meet the new head of HR, Legal and Finance at Patagonia two weeks ago.  They embrace family in a way I have just not seen and it was incredibly refreshing.  From the day care center to the kitchen in the morning filled with parents and kids before kicking off the day and learning of their family supporting policies, and commitment to the environment, inspired me beyond words.  I learned that 100% of their new mothers return to work because they are supported in such unique ways to be successful.  They believe in family in their words and actions.  A great outcome is their  tremendous passion for their work, succession and loyalty.  They take work life culture to a new level and their commitment to make the world better is serious.

If we want women and men to put family front and center (as I imagine you would want for yourself)  then our practices must change.  What is one step you can take to express your thoughts on this and start a new conversation with senior leaders and listen to what your workers value?

November 5, 2016 - No Comments!

Candidate Experience or Courtesy for 2017?

Forbes recently posted top workforce trends for 2017.  I was delighted to see at the top of the list that companies are focused on strengthening their candidate and employee experience.  There are several ideas around this that make it so powerful and relevant.

First, a great candidate experience means first understanding the power of common courtesy.  Being respectful of others matters for it reflects on who you are as a person and how your company brand is experienced. Our candidates tell us stories of prior interview experiences that make your hair curl and yes, we need more leaders to learn about being respectful of others.

Second, a great experience also means reducing the candidate's efforts to obtain feedback that matters to them.  I am not saying that we need to give everyone all of the granular data but where is common courtesy in this step?  We have heard stories where someone might be a contender for a cool role, interview, return for many discussions and then never hear what happened in the end, assuming there was an end to the process.  This happens to external partners of the company as well.  What gets in the way of closing loops?  I know everyone is very busy but it matters in building real connections that do result in good business.  Just like Zappos ability to connect to customers, track their questions, address challenges, every step of that journey is intended to be pleasant and respectful.

Third, relationships matter to your business.  These are relationships with candidates, parents of candidates, service providers that know candidates and it goes on from there.  You may not see a need for that candidate today or that service provider, but most likely you will tomorrow or next year.

How often are we creating experiences that connect everyone to what your desired intention is? Posting a job is one thing but offering an experience that turns the whole process upside down to say, "share your skills and passions with us, we wantEMM to know you" even though we don't have a job now, we want to know who you are, is powerful.  By seeking connections, there is a longer lasting benefit to everyone.  A great experience means a lot to those you want to work with, fans, loyal employees and even appreciative  partners."

Last thought:  A week ago I met Matthew Emerzian,  the founder of Every Monday Matters. He created a not-for-profit organization committed to creating a new normal where individuals and organizations understand how much and why they matter.  His book and education programs are taking off.  He captivated a room of business leaders looking to bring "purpose" into their culture.  Matthew said, "we have lost our ability to engage with each other."  He shared such a simple and powerful message that we all matter and can change from the inside out.   Let's look at both candidate experience and courtesy.

September 17, 2016 - No Comments!

Get Over it – New Workforce “Rules”

Are we over it yet?  Half of the workers in  your organizations will be under 30 and by 2025, everyone under 25 will be a digital native.  They grew up with all things tech. Innovation inside our companies will come from the digital natives.  So, why are we hanging on to old structures and ways of thinking about work?  Do we have leaders who just don't see this coming or chose to stick to models they grew up in?

It was great to see an LA Business Journal article last week about nontraditional work in LA.  There is an astounding number of workers who are self employed and data shows it is one in five or upward of one million people in this county.  They work in non-traditional jobs and are part of the underground cash economy.  They rule and love the entrepreneurial life.

There is a concentration in entertainment and creative however, this trend is spilling over into other sectors.  We are about 50% higher with number of self employed compared to other states in the country.   We are on a "fast - forward" when it comes to contingent workers, says, Manuel Pastor, professor of sociology and American studies at USC.

Remember our story about the creative economy that Otis College of Art and Design created?  Their 2015 report spoke about 166,000 non-employee arrangements and now we see that number increasing rapidly.   The government agencies will eventually have to deal with this new reality. It is not going away anytime soon.

Great talent is all over this -they don't need the structures of legacy systems.  They want to work in collaborative networks where skills matter.  Our clients are willing to pay for the skills they need, however, they are still hanging on to old models.  Now, we just need our Hiring Managers to get over it and think more about work, the plan to get things done, how to use technology and ensure that everyone understands the respected cultures in their network.  I know that is not easy.

What are the skills that will allow us to let go of controls that used to work but don't now?

  • Empathy - what do you want for the future and ask your workers what they value.
  • Anticipate Future - get the big picture and translate that into quarterly deliverables and ideal resources with options.
  • Match Maker - willing to look at the match up of resource and need in a variety of scenarios and factor in the cost of speedy or slow solution.
  • Piloting ideas - be okay with trying out an idea or new work arrangement. Tell others you are testing out feasibility and criteria for success.

Let's open up the conversations so that we can get over it and move forward.

August 20, 2016 - No Comments!

Out on a Limb? Are you an Original?

How about rejecting the default in us? Take a chance and get on that limb.  Adam Grant, in his new book, Originals, talks about taking those chances.

Are you exploring whether there is a better option or do you default to what you know? The start is curiosity and seeing things in fresh perspectives.  I know that is hard to do.  The job market is requiring us to reject the default in us.  Taking a role that you thought might be less than what you are skilled for might be scary, or away from the main stream but could result in new perspectives and ultimately new work.  It takes being on that limb for a bit.

Many of my friends are sending their children off to college this week - I hope they seek something new for themselves, something they never expected.  It might be something you never expected as well.

It is emotional letting them fly ( I have been there) and having them try something entirely new every day.  What a great time to be in college or start a business or create a new solution in your work.  Why can't we all do this?  Go out on a limb and create a spot in your weekly staff meeting for a "go out on a limb segment."  You may be surprised how refreshing and fun this is.   Increase your tolerance for what some might call being idealistic or eccentric as Adam Grant reflects on this.

Our son went to Loyola Marymount University for his undergrad work and double majored in Fine Arts and Communication.  We did not expect the art side of the equation and as business owners we have had brief moments of "yikes, he is out on that limb."  However, it has inspired and fed his creative spirit and productivity and ours too in delightfully new ways.

Younger talent will choose to speak up, express ideas and censor themselves less.  We can learn from them, take risks and be proud.